1 Yolrajas

Cratchit Family Essay Titles

The Cratchit family represent the 'real life' people to whom Scrooge could be kind and charitable, which for Dickens in this novel is a time of giving and generosity more than a Christian religious festival.  Bob Cratchit, Scrooge's clerk, is a poor man with a large family to support. In Stave 1, he is underpaid, and overworked, and bears Scrooge only goodwill, especially at Christmas time. Cratchit uncomplainingly bears with Scrooge's meanness, and is contrasted...

The Cratchit family represent the 'real life' people to whom Scrooge could be kind and charitable, which for Dickens in this novel is a time of giving and generosity more than a Christian religious festival.  Bob Cratchit, Scrooge's clerk, is a poor man with a large family to support. In Stave 1, he is underpaid, and overworked, and bears Scrooge only goodwill, especially at Christmas time. Cratchit uncomplainingly bears with Scrooge's meanness, and is contrasted with Scrooge's nephew, Fred, who is relatively well-off, and only wants to invite his Uncle to a family Christmas party, an invitation which Scrooge rebuffs.

In Stave 3, the Ghost of Christmas Present shows Scrooge images of starving children, and mockingly asks Scrooge 'Are there no prisons? Are there no workhouses?' The Ghost then reveals the reality of the Cratchit's poverty at home, and we understand that Scrooge has no idea until now of the Cratchit family struggles, including the care of their crippled son, 'Tiny Tim'. Still, he is dismissive. The Ghost indicates that the crippled child will be dead by next Christmas.

The Cratchits represent both a moral and political crux for Dickens: Christmas is or should be a time of generosity, materially and emotionally, and in the course of the tale, Scrooge undergoes a moral and emotional transformation and ends by treating the Cratchits to a good Chistmas and - we can infer - saving Tiny Tim's life.

The novel was written (in 1843) at a time when the Poor Laws in England were especially severe - condemning even men with (underpaid) jobs to imprisonment for debt. You should look up the writings of T.S.Malthus on 'The Principle of Population' (1798 - but still a work of note 50 years later) - whose treatise on the ratio of food production to consumers considered those unable to support themselves as virtually unfit to live. It was a well-endorsed political notion at the time, and the workhouses were full of men like Cratchit. Dickens reveals the Cratchits as the human face of these innumerable, dismissable 'poor' and gives them an individual, if highly sentimental, human family life.

+ All A Christmas Carol Essays:

  • Analysis of Poems 'Eurydice' and 'Mrs. Midas' by Carol-Ann Duffy
  • The Dualism of Joe Christmas
  • The Definition of Christmas
  • How Does Carol Ann Duffy Challenge the “Familiar Cultural Stereotypes” of Women in ‘Mrs Beast’??
  • Australian Christmas: A Holiday Short Story
  • Analysis of “Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?”
  • Religion Expressed Through Art
  • Our Italian Tradition
  • Sony Marketing Plan
  • Taking a Look at Celtic Music
  • A Comparison of Christmas in America and Spain
  • Marketing Using Social Networking
  • Shopping Malls
  • Critical Analysis of The Secret Of Raising Smart Kids”, Carol S. Dweck
  • Dracula Seen in New Eyes
  • Christmas in Kalahari
  • Main Street
  • Hindi Songs Copied from English Songs
  • Christmas Stories: Angel´s Dust
  • Analysis of “Prayer” by Carol Ann Duffy
  • The Year of the Woman
  • The Transition from Childhood to Adulthood in Joyce Carol Oates' Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?
  • Consider the Role and Treatment of Love in Carol Ann Duffy’s Valentine.
  • War Photographer by Carol Ann Duffy
  • Tim Burton's Particular Way of Making Films
  • Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been by Joyce Carol Oates
  • How are tension and suspense created in The Signalman and The Red
  • Grandama's Memories of the Great Depression
  • The Portrayal of Christopher Columbus in Elementary School Education
  • Jim Henson
  • Abominable: Gender Role and Women
  • Corporate Culture
  • Lucille Ball
  • Joyce Carol Oates' Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?
  • The Haunting of Humanity: Herman Melville
  • Ted Bundy
  • Comparing Salem Possessed by Paul Boyer, The Story of the Salem Witch Trials by Bryan Le Beau, and Devil in the Shape of a Woman by Carol Karlsen
  • The Italian Born Community in Australia
  • Analysis of The Hanged Man's Bride, The Trial for Murder and Confession Found in a Prison
  • Horror Films
  • Fdt4 Task 2
  • Charles Dickens
  • Personal Narrative- Christmas Cookies
  • Comparing Faulkner's Light in August and James' Portrait of a Lady
  • Ultimate Love in Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel
  • What is Oleanna?
  • Interpretation of Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been? by Joyce Carol Oates
  • MGMT 301 Organizational Behavior: Margaret Atwood's 'Cat's Eye' and Groupthink
  • Christmas as a Federal Holiday
  • The Religions, Holidays, Festivals, and Food of Germany
  • Asean Culture
  • Religious Symbols in Society: Church vs. State
  • Exploring the Role of Women in Mexico in Like Water For Chocolate
  • How Can the Use of Mental Images, Concepts and Schemas to Organise Our Thinking Help Us to Improve Our Memory?
  • A Brief Look at Ted Hughes
  • Unit 302
  • Goodnight Mr Tom Chapter Breakdown
  • The Success of The Simpsons
  • A Tragic Event in Shooting Stars by Carol Ann Duffy
  • A Lack of Charity
  • Santa Claus Does Exist
  • The Devil in Joyce Carol Oates' Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?
  • The Gap Between Rich and Poor
  • Carol Ann Duffy's Revision of Masculinist Representations of Female Identity
  • Questioning the Meaning of Life
  • Nat King Cole
  • Purely Mercenary: A Study of Capital in It’s a Wonderful Life
  • Charles Dickens
  • The Personality of Scrooge
  • Weaf Aat Level 2
  • Joyce Carol Oates' Where Are You Going? Where Have You Been?
  • Arnold Friend Symbolizes the Devil in Where are you Going, Where Have you been? by Joyce Carol Oates
  • Bah Humbug!: Having No One To Share Your Fortune With
  • Comparison of Modern Day Heroes and Beowulf
  • Use of Dramatic Techniques in Cartwright's Road and Kane's Blasted

Leave a Comment

(0 Comments)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *