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Sample Cover Letter For Employment Inquiry

Letter of Interest Examples and Format

A letter of interest, also known as a letter of inquiry or a prospecting letter, is sent to companies that may be hiring, but haven't listed a specific job opening to apply for. You can use a letter of interest to see if the company has any job openings that would be a good fit for you. You might also use a letter of interest to arrange an informational interview with someone at the company.

A letter of interest is a great way to get your foot in the door with a company you are interested in.

Read below for advice on how to write a letter of interest, as well as sample letters of interest for a variety of circumstances.

How to Format a Letter of Interest

Contact person. First, try to find someone specific at the company to send the letter to, such as an executive in a division you’re interested in. See if you have any connections at the company through family, friends, or former colleagues. If you know someone at the company, write directly to them. You could also ask that person for a referral to a hiring manager.

What to include in the letter. Your letter of interest should contain information on why the company interests you and why your skills and experience would be an asset to the company. Use the letter to sell yourself, explaining how you would add value to the company.

Letter conclusion. Conclude your letter by explaining that you would like to meet with the employer to explore possible career opportunities.

You might even suggest setting up an informational interview if there are no current vacancies at the company.

Include your contact information. In the conclusion, provide information on how you can be contacted if the company is interested in following up with you.

Keep your letter short and to the point. You want to get your point across quickly and clearly, without taking up too much of the employer’s time.

Take a look at these detailed tips and templates for how to write a letter of interest before you start writing your own letters.

How to Use a Letter of Interest: Examples

It is a good idea to review letter of interest examples before writing your letter. Along with helping with your layout, examples can help you see what kind of content you should include in your document (such as examples of your skills and experiences).

You might also look at a letter of interest template to get a sense of how to lay out your letter, and what to include (such as introductions and body paragraphs).

While examples, templates, and guidelines are a great starting point to your letter, you should always be flexible. You should tailor a letter to fit your work experience and the company you are contacting.

Letters of Interest, Letters of Inquiry, and Prospecting Letter Examples

Review these sample letters of interest, inquiry letters, and letters of introduction to get ideas for your own letters.

Email Letter of Inquiry Examples

Cover Letters vs. Inquiry Letters

A letter of inquiry is different from a cover letter. In a cover letter, you explain why you are a strong candidate for a particular job (rather than in a letter of inquiry, where you explain why you would be an asset to the company more generally).

A cover letter is used when you are applying for a specific job opening with an employer.

Read More: Top 10 Cover Letter Writing Tips | What to Include in a Cover Letter | Email Cover Letters  | Sample Cover Letters

On This Page:

What are Cover Letters and Letters of Inquiry?

Cover letters: When mailing your resume to prospective employers, it should always be accompanied by a cover letter. Your letter should capture the interest of the employer and communicate a personalized message about what you can contribute to that particular organization. Make sure to tailor your letters for each employer, because letters that are mass produced and generic are unappealing.

Letters of Inquiry: A letter of inquiry is similar to a cover letter, but it asks about possible job opportunities rather than responding to a specific job announcement.

What to Include

Begin by addressing your letter to a specific person. This may involve some research on your part, such as a call to the organization to find out the correct name and title of the person to whom you should write. "Dear Sir/Madam" is very impersonal and indicates a lack of real interest in the organization and the person to whom you should write.

In the body of the letter, make it short and to the point. Throughout the letter, avoid the use of flowery language and cliches. Identify who you are, why you are writing, and where you learned of the opening. Relate your qualifications and skills to the position or organization to which you are applying. This demonstrates your knowledge of the organization and illustrates how you can be an asset to them. Refer to your resume without restating it word for word. Your cover letter is supposed to highlight your resume. The goal is to emphasize a few strong, specific examples that highlight your experience, skills, passion, and qualifications. This is your time to communicate your passion, interest, and enthusiasm – utilize the time! To conclude the letter, indicate what you want to happen next. If you want an interview, ask for it.

Format and Style

Any business-style letter format is appropriate (e.g. full-block format, modified-block format). Always indicate whether there are enclosures included (e.g. resume, writing sample, transcript).

When writing your letter, keep in mind the reader's perspective. The most effective cover letters are clear, concise, and convey messages in three to five paragraphs. Your letter should not exceed one page in length.

Use paper that matches the paper of your printed resume. You may use matching envelopes or plain manila envelopes. Like the resume, your letter must be neat and typed with no spelling or grammar errors.

Examples

Read through our three paragraph model for writing cover letters, or click the images below for sample cover letters:

How We Can Help

Career & Academic Planning staff can review and provide feedback on your cover letter or other job search correspondence during a 30-minute individual meeting. At minimum, you need to have a first draft written to schedule an appointment. You can schedule an appointment online, or schedule an appointment by calling us at 540-568-6555.

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